Where can you rent kitchen / food production space?

One question I’m frequently asked is where a food producer, who had outgrown their home kitchen or whose home kitchen isn’t suitable, or who wants to expand, can rent kitchen / production space. I put together a list last year which is still fairly up to date, but I’m wondering if there are any cafes or restaurants or community centres that are closed at the moment who might be willing to rent their kitchens out? If so, please get in touch.

A number of food units around the country can be rented by the hour, week or longer term. Local Enterprise Offices (LEOs), Councils, the Rural Development Companies and some community and private enterprises have built proper food units finished to food production standard that you can rent – contact your local council, community office or enterprise company to enquire. Here is a selection on the island of Ireland:

Northern Ireland

The only Food Business Incubation Centre at the time of writing is situated at Loughry Campus in Cookstown, Co. Tyrone. The Centre was opened in 1998 and provides the food supply chain with eight purpose-built food processing factory units finished to the highest standards in two sizes, 175mand 225m2 (www.cafre.ac.uk). At the time of writing last year, there were plans afoot to build a second food enterprise centre in Armagh, but I’ll need to follow this up and see where its at.

Republic of Ireland

Connacht

The Food Hub in Drumshanbo, Co. Leitrim is a shining example. Operational since 2004, the Food Hub provides 26,000 sq. ft. of premium food production space across 14 independent work units and the Community Kitchen is a timeshare production unit where start-up food businesses can make their foods in a fully-equipped kitchen, paying by the hour (currently €15/hour) with no commitment other than to bring your own ingredients (www.thefoodhub.com);

Moy Valley Resources IRD has clients occupying Enterprise Units at a number of locations around Ballina, Co. Mayo, for a mixture of both food and non-food producers (www.moyvalley.ie);

Enterprise Castlerea in Co. Roscommon is currently developing a new facility which will include a kitchen and units to rent, called An Chistin in the Enterprise Hub; (www.castlereaenterprisehub.ie)

Castlehill Foods is a 900 sq. ft. (84m2) kitchen and food production premises available to hire outside Killala, Co. Mayo (contact Clair O’Connor on (087) 652 6065);

There is a new community kitchen available to rent in Balla, Co.Mayo. Contact Seamus Caulfield ballacrdmanager@gmail.com

Munster 

The North Tipperary Food Works in Rearcross, Newport, Co. Tipperary was developed by North Tipperary Food Enterprise Centre (Rearcross) Ltd. An old creamery building was converted into a premium food workspace. There is a timeshare kitchen and production units for rental. At the time of writing, the cost of rental of the timeshare kitchen is €15 per hour + VAT for the fully equipped kitchen which includes gas, water and electricity. The Food Production units cost €550 per month + VAT and as a tenant, you kit them out yourself as well as taking over utility bills (www.northtippfoodworks.ie);

The Limerick Food Centre at Raheen Business Park provides food manufacturing and processing units for commercial letting. Contact Gerry Fitzmaurice, M: +353-86-6380596, T: +353-61-712860, Gerry.Fitzmaurice@shannonproperties.ie(www.shannonproperties.ie);

The Ferbane Food Campus in Co.Offaly opened in 2003. Contact Donal Egan, Business Development Manager, Mobile: 085 877 6098 Tel: 090 6453926 Email: donal@ferbanefoodcampus.ie www.ferbanefoodcampus.ie

Cork County Council operates Cork Incubator Kitchens and can be contacted via www.corkincubatorkitchens.ie

Leinster

Nutgrove Enterprise Park, Dublin has two high-spec food production units, each 59.45m2 with own-door ground floor access and parking (www.nutgrove-enterprisepark.ie / info@dlrceb.ie);

SPADE Enterprise Centre is a community-based enterprise centre in the converted St. Paul’s Church at North King Street, Dublin (contact Susan Richardson, Centre Manager, (01) 617 4830 www.spade.ie);

Terenure Enterprise Centre (Dublin) has 3 fully-serviced food units (01) 490 3237 / www.terenure-enterprise.ie;

Hour Kitchen is a well equipped facility in Churchtown, Dublin 14.Tel. +353 1 298 0839; E-mail. info@hourkitchen.ie

In Kilkenny, The School of Food offers a commercial Kitchen for small or growing food businesses, professional Chefs or home Cooks to rent on a daily basis. Costs are €90 + VAT @ 23% per day or €45 + VAT @ 23% per half day and includeWaste, Electricity, Sanitizing Solution for Cleaning, Gas, Cleaning Equipment. Contact them at https://schooloffood.ie/incubation-kitchen

Newmarket Kitchen has opened in Bray. Co.Wicklow and offers shared kitchen space on a membership basis. Full details are available on www.newmarketkitchen.ie

Wicklow Enterprise Centre has two food units, comprising 92sq.m. and 85sq.m. approx, over two floors. Contact 0404-66433 www.wicklowenterprise.ie

Ulster

Údarás na Gaeltachta has three food units in Co. Donegal (www.udaras.ie);

Ballybay Food Park, Co.Monaghan has 3 units and an existing Production/Test/Training Kitchen already in the building. Tel: +353 87 602 5291  www.enterprisingmonaghan.ie

NAMECOUNTYShared / Community KitchenFOOD PRODUCTION UNITS
Enterprise and Research Incubation Campus CarlowCarlow02
Limerick Food CentreClare03
Ballyhoura Food CentreCork01
BIM Seafood Development KitchenCork12
Cork Incubator KitchensCork10
Kickstart KitchensCork20
Base Enterprise CentreDublin20
Enterprise Centres Ireland EastDublin10
Hour KitchenDublin40
Nutgrove Enterprise ParkDublin20
SPADE EnterpriseDublin119
Teagasc Food Research CentreDublin02
Terenure Enterprise CentreDublin02
The Liffey Trust Food HubDublin010
Acorn KitchensKildare10
The School of FoodKilkenny10
Mountmellick Food HubLaois13
The Food HubLeitrim118
Limerick Racecourse KitchenLimerick20
Ballyhoura Food CentreLimerick02
North East Regional Food CentreLouth10
Clar IRDMayo10
St. Coleman’s Training CentreMayo10
Moy Valley ResourcesMayo0tbc
Ballybay Enterprise ParkMonaghan10
Ferbane Food CampusOffaly13
The North Tipperary Food WorksTipperary13
Food Business Incubation CentreTyrone18
Newmarket KitchenWicklow10
Wicklow Enterprise CentreWicklow02
THIRD LEVEL INSTITUTIONS with available kitchen Space   
Athlone ITWestmeath10
Cork ITCork09
GMITGalway72
IT TallaghtDublin20
IT TraleeKerry22
Letterkenny ITDonegal50
St. Angela’s CollegeSligo10
PLANNED    
An ChistinRoscommon 10
Bia Innovator CampusGalway 12
Ballybay Enterprise ParkMonaghan04
Cavan LEOCavantbctbc

Labels for selling foods online

Source: Food Safety Authority of Ireland

As more food producers move to selling their foods online, also called “Distance Selling” whether using their own e-commerce site, via facebook, taking orders via SMS, phone, interactive TV, or supplying via on-line shops such as Amazon and others, its essential that labelling compliance is not overlooked. In summary, the same rules apply to foods sold online as they would if your customer walked into a shop to buy it in person.

For foods that are normally pre-packed, i.e, in packaging, the following rules apply:

(a) mandatory food information is still required (I covered in a previous post about food labels back in April), except for the date of minimum durability or use by date, and it must be available before the purchase is concluded and must appear either on the packaging (or it can be provided somewhere else, but you cannot charge your customers any extra for sending them elsewhere to get the information!).

(b) all mandatory particulars, including the use by or best before date, must be on the foods when they are delivered to the customer, i.e, on their doorstep!

For non pre-packed foods, the law requires the food business operator to provide information of any allergen in that food. (Again, if there is more information available to your Customer elsewhere, you can direct them there, but cannot charge them any extra for doing so).

In my opinion, the best and easiest thing to do is ensure you treat your online sales the same way as you would for sales through any retail outlet.

The Food Safety Authority of Ireland has good information in this regard for Irish producers. The Food Standards Agency also has great information here for UK producers.

I am really encouraging small food and drink producers to set up their own e-commerce site. In Ireland, there is a 90% grant available at the moment for doing this, its called a On-Line Trading Voucher. Check it out today! And when you’ve got it set up, let me know and I’ll add you to the Directory on oonagheats.com !

Understanding food labels

Foods that are wrapped (or pre-packed) have lots of information for consumers printed on the packaging, including the list of ingredients, the nutritional information storage instructions, the weight or volume, storage instructions, cooking instructions and more. If the food isn’t pre-wrapped for sale, then the only information that’s required are the Allergens.

There might also be marketing information, pictures, offers, games, competitions….a lot to take in! In terms of knowing what is in the food you are eating, the two important pieces are the Ingredients List and the Nutritional Analysis.

So, what has to be on the label? According to EU law, the information that is mandatory and must appear on the label of a prepacked food is:

(a) the name of the food
(b) the list of ingredients
(c) allergens or processing aids used in the manufacture or preparation of a food and still present in the finished product, even if in an altered form
(d) the quantity of certain ingredients (listed as a %)
(e) the net quantity (weight or volume)
(f) either the Best Before or Use By date

(g) any special storage conditions and/or conditions of use (temperature, time)
(h) the name or business name and address of the food business

(i) the country of origin or place of provenance, if applicable
(j) instructions for use, if required
(k) with respect to beverages containing more than 1.2 % by volume of alcohol, the actual alcoholic strength by volume
(l) Nutrition Declaration

The Ingredients List tells you what was used to make the food, and these are listed in order by weight from largest to smallest. In other words, the first ingredient listed is the largest amount, right down to the last ingredient which is the smallest amount.

The whole E number issue can be confusing, and sometimes people may think that E numbers are all bad. In fact, many naturally occurring foods have their own E number like seaweed (carrageenan or agar), silver and gold even! Many other e-numbers are given to the substances that are extracted from natural products like those from vegetable oils used in bread.

The Allergens (if any) are highlighted in the list of ingredients, usually in bold or italics or underlined.

Nutritional Labelling is required on all foods by law unless you’re a very small producer and only selling small quantities locally (i.e., within a 100km radius).

The nutrition panel has to show:
(a) The energy value (in KJ or kcal), and
(b) The quantities of fat (including saturates), carbohydrate (including sugars), protein and salt – in that order!

The food producer can also choose to give the amount of one or more of the following if they wish to: (a) Monounsaturates, (b) Polyunsaturates, (c) Polyols,
(d) Starch,(e) Fibre, (f) Any of the vitamins or minerals.

The Nutrients must be declared per 100g or per 100ml:

Mandatory Information / 100g or ml
Supplementary Information
(if desired)
Energy (kJ / kcal)
Fat
of which Saturates
of which Monounsaturates
of which Polyunsaturates
Carbohydrate
of which Sugars
of which polyols
of which starch
Fibre
Protein
Salt
Vitamins & Minerals (% RI)
All of these must be listed on the label
The producer MAY include all of these if they should wish to
(either all or none)

Some food labels also include an additional column to show the Nutrition information per portion. For example, per bag, per slice, per sandwich. This is useful for the consumer who may find it tricky to work it out for themselves, but it’s not a legal requirement.
Front of pack labelling is also voluntary – the pack can show the Energy on its own or the Energy, fat, saturates, sugar and salt (all of these).

The terms “Best Before” and “Use By” dates often cause confusion. It’s really important to note that these terms are not interchangeable! “Best Before” generally applies to foods that have a long shelf life and “Use By” applies to perishable foods or foods that, if you eat them after that date, might cause food poisoning. Never take chances with “Use By” dates! Safefood has a great phrase – Best Before is a guideline, Use By is a deadline!

For more information about labelling, check out https://www.fsai.ie/legislation/food_legislation/food_information_fic/general_fic_provisions.html
For more information about allergens: https://www.fsai.ie/legislation/food_legislation/food_information/14_allergens.html