Calling Co.Mayo Food & Drinks Producers!

We are currently working on the development of a Mayo Food & Drinks Strategy 2020-2025 on behalf of South West Mayo Development Company CLG and Local Enterprise Office Mayo. The team has been very busy talking to food and drinks producers in Mayo and stakeholders including agencies, producers’ groups, support agencies, hotels, restaurants and consumers to get a good picture of what is going on in the county. 

At the moment the audit and database of producers is being finalised to try to make sure that everyone who is anyone in Food & Drink in Mayo in included. So, we want to talk to food and drink producers, producer groups (e.g., organic groups, bee-keepers, GIY, lamb and beef groups and others), food retailers and food and drink distributors to find out how you’re getting on, what you might need for the future of your businesses in terms of resources, funding, production space, staff, distribution, training and more to ensure that will be captured in the strategy. Three on-line workshops took place in April (via Zoom of course!) and were really well attended by food and drink producers across the county.

You can add your own details to the producers database (it’s not going to be published anywhere, it’s just to get the big picture for the purposes of developing the strategy)> it will take just a few minutes, and you can access it by downloading it here and emailing it back to me by Monday 22nd June.

We’re starting to wind down the Needs Analysis element of the project, so this is a last call out to anyone who is involved in producing foods in Mayo to complete our short (3 minutes!) survey. Please just click this link and complete it by Monday 22nd June.

For more details please contact 

Oonagh Monahan, Alpha Omega Consultants

086-1760496 or E-mail: oonagh@alphaomega.ie


Thank you!

Labels for selling foods online

Source: Food Safety Authority of Ireland

As more food producers move to selling their foods online, also called “Distance Selling” whether using their own e-commerce site, via facebook, taking orders via SMS, phone, interactive TV, or supplying via on-line shops such as Amazon and others, its essential that labelling compliance is not overlooked. In summary, the same rules apply to foods sold online as they would if your customer walked into a shop to buy it in person.

For foods that are normally pre-packed, i.e, in packaging, the following rules apply:

(a) mandatory food information is still required (I covered in a previous post about food labels back in April), except for the date of minimum durability or use by date, and it must be available before the purchase is concluded and must appear either on the packaging (or it can be provided somewhere else, but you cannot charge your customers any extra for sending them elsewhere to get the information!).

(b) all mandatory particulars, including the use by or best before date, must be on the foods when they are delivered to the customer, i.e, on their doorstep!

For non pre-packed foods, the law requires the food business operator to provide information of any allergen in that food. (Again, if there is more information available to your Customer elsewhere, you can direct them there, but cannot charge them any extra for doing so).

In my opinion, the best and easiest thing to do is ensure you treat your online sales the same way as you would for sales through any retail outlet.

The Food Safety Authority of Ireland has good information in this regard for Irish producers. The Food Standards Agency also has great information here for UK producers.

I am really encouraging small food and drink producers to set up their own e-commerce site. In Ireland, there is a 90% grant available at the moment for doing this, its called a On-Line Trading Voucher. Check it out today! And when you’ve got it set up, let me know and I’ll add you to the Directory on oonagheats.com !

A little history of bread in Ireland

Bread was first made by the ancient Egyptians as far back as the year 8000BC when grains, cultivated on the fertile banks of the River Nile, were ground by hand to make flat bread. Over the centuries, farmers across Europe started to grow grains for bread as it became a staple in the diet. The oldest record of bread in Ireland was also a flat bread, dating back to the Stone Age. As bread-making made its way west across Europe, the Norman invasion brought new bread making methods to Ireland. Sometime in the 11th Century, fine sieves were used to separate the bran and white bread was born, a privilege of the nobility. Thankfully nowadays, white bread is for everyone and is an everyday staple food. 

The first Bakers’ Guild charter in Ireland was granted in 1478 by King Edward IV, from which arose (no pun intended!) many Bakers’ Guilds or Societies in Dublin and elsewhere in Ireland. The Boot Lane Society and Little Britain St. Society were among the most prominent of these, starting in 1847. In Limerick, there are records from 1837 and records in Cork date from the 1860’s. In fact, there were a great many “journeymen” bakers who would travel around the country wherever the work brought them. 

Of course, in Ireland, we are very familiar with Irish Soda bread. While we might hink we invented it here in Ireland, there are varieties of soda bread found in many countries. What we do know is that baking soda was introduced into Ireland in the mid 19th Century. The origin of bicarbonate of soda (bread soda or baking soda), a key ingredient, is unclear, with claims that it was invented in France or Germany, depending on what you read. Long before this, potash was used in baking by the native Americans to make their version of soda bread. How it works is that the lactic acid in buttermilk reacts with the alkaline bread soda which creates tiny bubbles and so allows the bread to rise. According to some sources, the reason that soda bread was so popular in Ireland intially was that it didn’t require yeast, which was relatively expensive. Furthermore, yeast bread took time for the bread to prove and rise, whereas soda bread could be made very quickly. It was also better suited to the type of flour which was available at the time. 

During the Industrial Revolution, bread tins and milling and baking equipment were developed, meaning that bread could be made on a bigger scale. Other types of bread that grew in popularity over the centuries include the batch loaf and the turnover grinder, which was particularly associated with Dublin.

One of the things that all the bakeries have in common is that the bread is baked every day (well, every night really) for delivery across the country in the early morning so that you can have fresh bread on your table every day. The other, is that the love of bread in the Irish diet remains to this day and truly has stood the test of time. There are some things that just don’t change!

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FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THE HISTORY OF BREAD YOU CAN VISIT 

New directory resource for food & drinks producers selling on line!

Good morning everyone,

Spring is Sprung and its a lovely day here. I hope it is where you are too, though I’m afraid we’re not able to go out too far to enjoy it. I’ve been thinking a lot over the past few days about how I might be able to help my food and drinks producer clients and others during these difficult times. I know there is a lot of information coming at us, it can be overwhelming. I’m not sure I can take another online seminar at the moment to be honest!

Resilience is a trait that I think we all need in spades, especially now. Rearranging our lives, our routines, our work, trying not to lose clients, trying to show agility, compromise, accommodation, its all a bit exhausting.

I wanted to do something practical, something useful and tangible, not more talking, and not just sending out more information as there’s a lot of noise already! So, I’ve set up a new page here on Oonagheats.com where you’ll find a directory listing food and drink producers around the country who are now selling online and delivering. So many have lost their routes to market over the past few weeks since farmers markets, country markets, cafés and restaurants are closed and this is just a little helping hand (I hope) to try and get the word out there.

So if you are a food or drinks producer who has had to move to online sales since farmers’ markets and many retail shops are now closed, or your distribution channels have stopped, please get in touch so I can include you. All I need is your business name, website shop link and the county you’re in.

You can email me on moneyforjambook@gmail.com

Hang in there, this too shall pass.

Oonagh x

Understanding food labels

Foods that are wrapped (or pre-packed) have lots of information for consumers printed on the packaging, including the list of ingredients, the nutritional information storage instructions, the weight or volume, storage instructions, cooking instructions and more. If the food isn’t pre-wrapped for sale, then the only information that’s required are the Allergens.

There might also be marketing information, pictures, offers, games, competitions….a lot to take in! In terms of knowing what is in the food you are eating, the two important pieces are the Ingredients List and the Nutritional Analysis.

So, what has to be on the label? According to EU law, the information that is mandatory and must appear on the label of a prepacked food is:

(a) the name of the food
(b) the list of ingredients
(c) allergens or processing aids used in the manufacture or preparation of a food and still present in the finished product, even if in an altered form
(d) the quantity of certain ingredients (listed as a %)
(e) the net quantity (weight or volume)
(f) either the Best Before or Use By date

(g) any special storage conditions and/or conditions of use (temperature, time)
(h) the name or business name and address of the food business

(i) the country of origin or place of provenance, if applicable
(j) instructions for use, if required
(k) with respect to beverages containing more than 1.2 % by volume of alcohol, the actual alcoholic strength by volume
(l) Nutrition Declaration

The Ingredients List tells you what was used to make the food, and these are listed in order by weight from largest to smallest. In other words, the first ingredient listed is the largest amount, right down to the last ingredient which is the smallest amount.

The whole E number issue can be confusing, and sometimes people may think that E numbers are all bad. In fact, many naturally occurring foods have their own E number like seaweed (carrageenan or agar), silver and gold even! Many other e-numbers are given to the substances that are extracted from natural products like those from vegetable oils used in bread.

The Allergens (if any) are highlighted in the list of ingredients, usually in bold or italics or underlined.

Nutritional Labelling is required on all foods by law unless you’re a very small producer and only selling small quantities locally (i.e., within a 100km radius).

The nutrition panel has to show:
(a) The energy value (in KJ or kcal), and
(b) The quantities of fat (including saturates), carbohydrate (including sugars), protein and salt – in that order!

The food producer can also choose to give the amount of one or more of the following if they wish to: (a) Monounsaturates, (b) Polyunsaturates, (c) Polyols,
(d) Starch,(e) Fibre, (f) Any of the vitamins or minerals.

The Nutrients must be declared per 100g or per 100ml:

Mandatory Information / 100g or ml
Supplementary Information
(if desired)
Energy (kJ / kcal)
Fat
of which Saturates
of which Monounsaturates
of which Polyunsaturates
Carbohydrate
of which Sugars
of which polyols
of which starch
Fibre
Protein
Salt
Vitamins & Minerals (% RI)
All of these must be listed on the label
The producer MAY include all of these if they should wish to
(either all or none)

Some food labels also include an additional column to show the Nutrition information per portion. For example, per bag, per slice, per sandwich. This is useful for the consumer who may find it tricky to work it out for themselves, but it’s not a legal requirement.
Front of pack labelling is also voluntary – the pack can show the Energy on its own or the Energy, fat, saturates, sugar and salt (all of these).

The terms “Best Before” and “Use By” dates often cause confusion. It’s really important to note that these terms are not interchangeable! “Best Before” generally applies to foods that have a long shelf life and “Use By” applies to perishable foods or foods that, if you eat them after that date, might cause food poisoning. Never take chances with “Use By” dates! Safefood has a great phrase – Best Before is a guideline, Use By is a deadline!

For more information about labelling, check out https://www.fsai.ie/legislation/food_legislation/food_information_fic/general_fic_provisions.html
For more information about allergens: https://www.fsai.ie/legislation/food_legislation/food_information/14_allergens.html

IQFA Food Hero winner!

This post is long overdue, but back in October 2019 I was awarded the inaugural Food Hero award from the IQFAs (Irish Quality Food and Drink Awards), sponsored by Aldi Ireland. Needless to say I was absolutely delighted!

Quality Food Awards 25th Oct 2019 Karl Hussey Photography 2019.

The 2019 Irish Quality Food and Drink Awards took place on Thursday 24 October at The Clayton Hotel on Burlington Road, Dublin. Hector O’hEochagáin was MC for the event. The evening was a huge success with food producers and retailers being recognised for their hard work.

Here I am pictured with John Curtin, Group Buying Director, Aldi Ireland and Hector O’hEochagáin.

Ten Top Tips for Starting Your Own Small Food Business – new course!

Hi everyone!

Just very quickly, having just finished training a great group of early stage food producers in Mayo in November and another group in Leitrim in January & February on the Food Starter programme from Bord Bia, I’m delighted now to bring you my new, very special, one day course which will be held in the Neantóg Kitchen Garden School, hosted by the fantastic Gaby & Hans Wieland.

So if you’ve ever wondered what’s involved, who to talk to, where to start, then take just one day to check out the potential for your food business by coming on this new course!

March 30th, Saturday: Top 10 Tips for starting your own small food business
**Guest Lecturer Series**

with Oonagh Monahan from 10:00am – 4:00pm, €100 per person
A unique opportunity to learn from one of Ireland’s leading small business mentors, in a small intimate setting. Get all your questions answered about the what where when and how to set up your own small food business, including the latest in legislation and registration requirements. Case studies will highlight the challenges and satisfaction of small food production.

I hope to see you there!

Oonagh

Meet the new Chartered Food Scientist!

Just a quick blog today to tell you some recent happy news!  Oonagh is delighted to have been awarded Chartered Scientist status by the Institute of Food Science and Technology.

The certificate arrived in the post the other day so it reminded me to let you know! The Chartered Scientist qualification is awarded to scientists who meet the high standards required and demands a commitment to continuing professional development. It is intended to ensure high and improving standards across all scientific disciplines and reflects best practice in science.

What is a Chartered Scientist?

Chartered Scientist (CSci) status is aimed at those practising science at the full professional level and at those for whom scientific knowledge or practice at that level form an essential element in the fulfilment of their role.

Chartered Scientist status provides valuable professional recognition among fellow scientists across all disciplines and the wider community. It demonstrates high levels of experience and competence to employers, other professionals, and, ultimately, providing reassurance to the consumer that high standards are being met within the industry, particularly on food safety. It is now a recognised title under the EU Directive 89/48/EC.

The IFST awards Chartered Scientist status under licence from the Science Council. The Chartered Scientist award is only available for professional level of membership (Member and Fellow).

YAY ME!! 🙂

Tardy with the blogging, but busy with the social media!

Oh I’ve been very tardy with the blogging this year. But, in my defence, I’ve been very active on Facebook, where I have two pages – oonagheats which mostly features me reviewing restaurants and various foods and MoneyforJambook for new food startups, interesting foods I’ve come across in supermarkets and food producers. I’m on twitter @oonagheats (I love twitter!) and Instagram @oonagheats too though, so if you’re looking for a morsel, then please find me there!

And ofcourse for those of you interested in starting up your own food business but don’t know where to begin, my book Money for Jam is still for sale in bookshops all over the place and from online booksellers – here is the link to the list!

Money for Jam – 2nd edition – The essential guide to starting your own small foot business – Oonagh Monahan – book launch – Oasta Cafe . pic Frances Muldoon.

 

New food trends 2018

What will be the big food trend in 2018? We’ve already seen how protein-enriched food
has moved mainstream, no longer the preserve of the elite athlete or mud-runner! The vegan or the plant based diet as its now known, has grown hugely in popularity, as has vegetarianism.

I came across this great yogurt concept at Gifted in the RDS in December. It’s called ProU, based in Dublin, available widely. Lovely people, great yogurt, made by Killowen Farm in Wexford.

(Photo: Farmers’ Journal)

I suspect that sugar will stay high on the no-no list, and rightly so. Fat isn’t so bad in moderation, (yay for real butter!), and everyone needs their carbs (be gone, Atkins Diet).  The free-from market grows and grows, though it drives me mad when I hear Gluten-free described as “healthy”. It’s no healthier than gluten-containing foods. Don’t get me started, I’ll post about that another day.

Someone said to me last week that they reckon cauliflower will be the veg of choice in 2018. I had a great meal which featured cauli done 5 ways lately in Fallon & Byrne, including great colourful varieties. I was always a fan of cauliflower cheese for supper, with white toast buttered on the side. Delicious! I posted a photo of this on twitter before Christmas.

For me, fresh, healthy, great tasting, convenient, food on the go is something I’m always on the look out for. In 2017, Chopped was a revelation for me – a fantastic concept, well executed.

So what’ll it be? Please get in touch and let me know your thoughts. You’ll get me here or on twitter @oonagheats.